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Welcome to National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) 2019. This marks 21 years of commemorating the important work that the FTC, state attorneys general offices and many community partner organizations do to protect consumers across the country.

NCPW is a time to help people understand their consumer rights and make well-informed decisions about their money. Our team at the FTC works hard to shut down scams and sue those who break the law. But one of our best tools to protect consumers is education.

You are a vital part of this effort. We need people like you, talking to those in your community about the issues that are affecting you. Whether it’s imposter scams, dealing with debt collection, or recovering from identity theft, the FTC has resources to help you start those conversations, and share important tips with your friends and family.

Looking to get even more involved? Find out how at FTC.gov/NCPW. Here, you’ll find tools to promote NCPW in your own community, as well as links to our partners’ websites with information about their initiatives and events.

Speaking of events, I’d like to remind you that we have some exciting social media events planned this week. I hope you’ll join us.

Wednesday, March 6th at 3pm EST: Twitter chat with The Department of Education’s office of Federal Student Aid

Join @FTC and @FAFSA on Twitter for a chat about how to avoid student loan repayment scams. Be part of the conversation using the hashtag #NCPW2019.

Thursday, March 7th at 12pm EST: Facebook Live with Social Security Administration

We’ll join our colleagues from the Social Security Administration (SSA) to discuss scams that involve people pretending to be SSA officials. Learn about these imposter scams and how to avoid them.

Friday, March 8th at 11am EST: Twitter chat with Identity Theft Resource Center

Join @FTC and @ITRCSD on Twitter for a chat about how you can protect yourself against tax identity theft this tax season. Follow along using the #NCPW2019 hashtag.

Last but certainly not least, check out this video of some Bureau of Consumer Protection staff celebrating NCPW. Please watch, enjoy and share with friends and family.

 

 

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