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Consumer Alert

Considering fertility products? Spot the fake claims

Lisa Lake
People facing difficulties having children often explore fertility products to help them get pregnant. But some products, including some dietary supplements that claim to solve fertility problems
Consumer Alert

Don’t be CBDeceived by junk science

Lisa Lake
If you’ve explored alternative treatments for medical conditions, you’ve probably noticed that CBD products are pretty popular. But if an ad claims a CBD-based product is scientifically proven to cure
Consumer Alert

Isoprex misleads seniors

Lisa Weintraub Schifferle
“Isoprex Slashes Pain in 5 Days – Naturally!” “Walking without a Cane!” “Clinically Proven!” “Relieves painful swelling in 100% of even the worst cases.” These claims are false or misleading
Consumer Alert

Sprays and pills that cure it all? Not true.

Rosario Méndez
Marketers try to sell us things like sprays and pills that supposedly cure it all, help us lose weight, get rid of wrinkles, and more. But some marketers make claims about their products without
Consumer Alert

Supplements for joint pain: don’t believe the hype

Jim Kreidler
If you experience joint pain when you walk or move, promises for a quick and inexpensive cure can be hard to resist. But don’t believe the hype. And don’t assume the people you see in the ads are real
Consumer Alert

Claims in weight loss ads might be false

Rosario Méndez
Some ads for weight loss products promise miracles. They might say that the product works for everyone or will let you lose weight permanently. Those claims are lies. Dishonest advertisers will tell
Consumer Alert

Ask a health professional before popping that pill

Bridget Small
When I was young, I wanted the shoes that would make me run faster and jump higher. Now, I wish my brain would run a little faster when I can't remember my account passwords. Unfortunately, some shady
Consumer Alert

Cure Encapsulations’ misleading claims and fake reviews

Cristina Miranda
“Burn fat. Reduce cravings. Feel better. Lose weight.” Some dietary supplements come with big promises backed by five-star customer reviews. But do these supplements really do what they say? And can
Consumer Alert

FTC & FDA issue warning letters to supplement sellers

Colleen Tressler
Ads abound for products that claim to treat or prevent serious health conditions. Unfortunately, these products often are unproven and useless. Sometimes the ads even make false promises for Alzheimer