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If you manage someone else’s money, protecting your loved one from financial exploitation and scams is among your important responsibilities. Starting September 21st, 2018, a new federal law lets some financial caregivers request a security freeze, also called a credit freeze, on their loved one’s behalf. Taking this step can help protect them from identity theft and fraud.

Anyone can be a victim of identity theft

Identity theft happens when someone steals personal information, such as a Social Security number. That lets hackers, thieves, and even people you know open new credit cards and other financial accounts in your name. A security freeze restricts access to your credit reports and makes it hard for identity thieves to open new accounts in your name. Under the new law, it’s free to freeze and unfreeze your credit file at all three of the nationwide consumer reporting agencies – Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

Help for financial caregivers

But what about people who can’t manage their finances on their own? The new law lets people with certain legal authority act on someone else’s behalf to freeze and unfreeze their credit file. The new law defines a “protected consumer” as an incapacitated person, someone with an appointed guardian or conservator, or a child under the age of 16.

If you’re acting on behalf of a protected consumer, you must give the credit reporting agencies proof of authority before you can freeze and unfreeze the protected consumer’s credit. Proof of authority includes:

  • A court order (such as an order naming you guardian or conservator), or
  • A valid power of attorney.

To freeze or unfreeze the credit file of a child under 16, you must provide other proof of authority. 

You’ll also need to provide proof of your identity, which can be your Social Security card, your birth certificate, or your driver’s license or other government issued identification.

To learn how to request a security freeze, read this blog

More resources to help you manage someone else’s money

  • If you’ve been named to manage money for an adult who needs help, the Managing Someone Else’s Money guides will walk you through four different fiduciary roles and provide tips on spotting financial exploitation and avoiding scams.
  • If you believe a credit reporting agency is not placing a security freeze properly, you can submit a complaint to the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection at consumerfinance.gov/complaint.

If you think you or someone you know is a victim of identity theft, visit the Federal Trade Commission’s IdentityTheft.gov to get a personalized step-by-step recovery plan.

6 Comments


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The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

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Khe
September 27, 2018
If someone used my accounts arrests them on the spot
pringlecarmen
September 28, 2018
Thanks FTC.
kangsikseoul
September 28, 2018
Even Koreans appreciate this info.
Ali Erdogan
September 28, 2018
When Consumer won Money on line system and Consumer ask and want account keept safe under secure some one can't trick fraud scam and known cunsomer info with on line
Sandra
October 15, 2018
That's good
Icare4mom
August 03, 2019
SO helpful to people responsible for managing the finances of parents with dementia or Alzheimer’s!