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You’ve probably gotten one of these calls: They say it’s the IRS and they’re filing a lawsuit against you for back taxes. They may threaten to arrest or deport you. What do you do? Watch this video to learn more:

The FTC worked with AARP to create a series of videos about imposter scams – including IRS imposters, Medicare scams, and robocalls. While the videos are aimed at older Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, the tips apply to everyone. Last week, we highlighted Medicare scams; this week, it’s IRS imposters. Next week, stay tuned for robocalls.

In the video, you’ll hear how these calls may sound – and then learn to spot and avoid these scammers. So, if you get a call from someone claiming to be from the IRS:

  • Hang up. Don’t give personal or financial information to someone claiming to be from the IRS. If in doubt, call the IRS directly at 1-800-829-1040.
  • Don’t send money by wire transfer, prepaid card or gift card to someone claiming to be from the IRS. That’s a scam. The IRS will not require a specific type of payment.
  • Report the call. Report phony IRS calls to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at tigta.gov or to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint. The more we hear from you, the more we can help fight scams.
  • Tell your community. Let your family and friends know about IRS imposters.

For more information about stopping imposter scams, visit ftc.gov/imposters. And to learn about how to stop unwanted calls, including using call blocking technology, go to ftc.gov/calls.

To read a version of this blog post in Tagalog, click here. Upang mabasa ang bersyon ng blog post na ito sa Tagalog, mag-click dito.

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如需閱讀此篇博客的繁體中文版,請點擊這裡

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The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

  • We won’t post off-topic comments, repeated identical comments, or comments that include sales pitches or promotions.
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