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Did the IRS email about your economic impact payment? It's a scam. Report it to reportfraud.ftc.govThere’s a fake IRS email that keeps popping into people’s inboxes. It says that you can get a third Economic Impact Payment (EIP) if you click a link that lets you “access the form for your additional information” and “get help” with the application. But the link is a trick. If you click it, a scammer might steal your money and your personal information to commit identity theft. It’s yet another version of the classic government impersonator scam.

Here are ways to avoid this scam:

  • Know that the government will never call, text, email, or contact you on social media saying you owe money, or to offer help getting a third Economic Impact Payment (EIP). If you get a message with a link from someone claiming to be from the IRS or another government agency, don’t click on it. It’s a scam. Scammers will often send fake links to websites or use bogus email addresses and phone numbers that seem to be from the government. Your best bet is to visit the IRS’s website directly for trustworthy information on EIP payments.
  • Say no to anyone who contacts you, claiming to be from a government agency and asking for personal or financial information, or for payment in cash, gift cards, wire transfers, or cryptocurrency. Whether they contact you by phone, text, email, on social media, or show up in person, don’t share your Social Security, Medicare ID, driver’s license, bank account, or credit card numbers. And know that the government would never ask you to pay to get financial help.
  • Report government impersonators to ReportFraud.ftc.gov. Your report makes a difference. Reports like yours help us investigate, bring law enforcement cases, and alert people about what frauds to be on the lookout for so they can protect themselves, their friends, and family.

Visit ftc.gov/imposters to find out more about government impersonators. And to learn more about the signs of a scam, what to do, and how to report it, check out ftc.gov/scams.

6 Comments


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The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

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JP80
October 28, 2021
What happens if I already clicked on this link??
FTC Staff
October 28, 2021

In reply to by JP80

If you clicked a link, a scammer might steal your money and your personal information to commit identity theft. If you gave information like your Social Security, Medicaid, Medicare, bank account, credit card, or license numbers to a scammer, they can use it to take your money, or open new credit in your name. 

Read about these clues that someone has stolen your identity. If you think someone did steal it, go to IdentityTheft.gov to report it and get help to recover from problems caused by the theft.

Nodumbblonde
October 27, 2021
And they are appearing on Facebook, along with items which are against their community standards, such as dogs, etc... Someone needs to make FB accountable!
DonRailRoad't …
October 27, 2021
Is there a third check pending? I checked the website a few months and filled out the form and have not received and information. I am just curious if there is actually a third check pending! Thank You for the information that you provided!
DiddyD
October 27, 2021
Yes but I received a actual letter in the mail from the IRS supposedly, that said that I could find out information about my possible third payment. And I don’t get a payment, but I was worried about identity theft then. You don’t mention that in this article.