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Share What You Know. Stop Scams.

Chances are good that someone you know has been scammed. They may not talk about it, but the statistics do.

The truth is that sharing what you know can help protect someone who you know from a scam.

Download and order materials to pass on

Materials to Pass On

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Your information is valuable. To you–and other people.

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You get a lot of unwanted calls. Many are from scammers.

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Impersonator Scams
Someone calls to ask for money. Are they who they say they are?

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You have a Medicare card, but a caller says you need a new one.

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You won a prize! But you can't get it until you send money.

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Someone offers to repair your home. Cheap. For cash now.

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An ad promises quick and easy money. Guaranteed. No risk.

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Ads promise big money working from home. For a fee.

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Someone asks you to donate money to a charity. Today.

Materials to Pass On

Materials to Pass On
Download: Articles, PowerPoints, Bookmarks

Resources

Connect to services for older adults, caregivers, and families at Eldercare Locator.

From Consumer Alerts

Consumer Alert

No one is using your Social Security number to commit crimes. It’s a scam.

Alvaro Puig
The phone rings. Your caller ID says it’s the Social Security Administration. You hesitate. You’re not expecting a call from them, and you’ve heard about impersonation scams. But something inside you makes you pick up. And everything you’re about to hear is designed to scare you into doing whatever the caller says.
Consumer Alert

Pay your bills, not impersonators

Andrew Rayo
If you’re paying a medical, utility, or other bill online, you probably expect to wind up on the company’s website. What might you not expect? An impersonator tricking you into paying them instead. But that’s what the FTC says a company called Doxo did. Here’s what you need to know.
Consumer Alert

Looking for a postal job? Also look out for job scams

Kira Krown
Thinking about applying for a job with the United States Postal Service (USPS)? Make sure you’re dealing with the real thing. Scammers advertise jobs that don’t actually exist to try to steal your money and personal information — and one way they do that is by pretending to be USPS. So how do you know if that postal ad or offer you get is a scam?