Skip to main content

This April is Financial Literacy Month, so this week we’re talking about financial resiliency. The Coronavirus has been devastating for many people’s financial lives. Through no fault of their own, millions have lost jobs, businesses, and savings due to the financial impact of the pandemic. Many folks are simply trying to decide how to put food on the table and keep their housing. Some, who were able to keep their jobs, are hanging in there. And others are somewhere in between.

Over the next five days, we’ll talk about some back-to-basics steps for anyone looking ahead toward financial recovery. We’ll talk about managing debt, avoiding payment scams, checking your credit, and spotting job scams. As we work to get our lives back to normal, it’s more important than ever to look out for each other, our family, friends, and neighbors. So, when you spot a scam, report it to the FTC. And then tell those around you about it so they can protect themselves.

Also, check out and share this video about why to report scams.

We hope you’ll stay tuned this week for some practical ideas you can share with your family, friends, and community. Share this blog, the video, and follow along on social media at #FinancialLiteracyMonth.

Search Terms

3 Comments


It is your choice whether to submit a comment. If you do, you must create a user name, or we will not post your comment. The Federal Trade Commission Act authorizes this information collection for purposes of managing online comments. Comments and user names are part of the Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) public records system, and user names also are part of the FTC’s computer user records system. We may routinely use these records as described in the FTC’s Privacy Act system notices. For more information on how the FTC handles information that we collect, please read our privacy policy.

The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

  • We won’t post off-topic comments, repeated identical comments, or comments that include sales pitches or promotions.
  • We won’t post comments that include vulgar messages, personal attacks by name, or offensive terms that target specific people or groups.
  • We won’t post threats, defamatory statements, or suggestions or encouragement of illegal activity.
  • We won’t post comments that include personal information, like Social Security numbers, account numbers, home addresses, and email addresses. To file a detailed report about a scam, go to ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

We don't edit comments to remove objectionable content, so please ensure that your comment contains none of the above. The comments posted on this blog become part of the public domain. To protect your privacy and the privacy of other people, please do not include personal information. Opinions in comments that appear in this blog belong to the individuals who expressed them. They do not belong to or represent views of the Federal Trade Commission.

Mary Ellen
April 05, 2021
What a commendable program! Learning about $ is the best place to start to rebuild again. Never give up. Keep learning.
Sand Dunes
April 05, 2021
Attempting to file for unemployment in my State has been difficult. Is there a problem in many States with this issue?
Sctter
April 06, 2021

In reply to by Sand Dunes

Yes. And if you take a temp position they cut you off and you have to start over. No human interaction.