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National Consumer Protection Week (NCPW) 2022 is coming up next week, and we hope you’ll join some of the virtual events. NCPW is a time when the FTC joins with local, state, and national partners to bring you information and advice on scams, identity theft, and other consumer protection issues.

Here’s a preview of some events you can join — and share in your network — during NCPW, March 6-12, 2022.

All week

Sunday, March 6

  • (In-person event) 11:30am CST: Join the FTC at the Trinity Lutheran Church in Fort Worth, Texas, for a presentation on how to identify, avoid, and report scams online.

Tuesday, March 8

Wednesday, March 9

Thursday, March 10

  • Join NCPW Twitter chats on avoiding Coronavirus and impersonator scams.
    • 1pm EST: Join the Twitter chat in Spanish with @laFTC@USAGovEspanol and @SeguroSocial. Follow the conversation by using hashtags #OjoConLasEstafas and #NCPW2022.
    • 3pm EST: Join the Twitter chat in English with @FTC@USAGov, and @SocialSecurity. Follow the conversation by using hashtags #SlamTheScamChat and #NCPW2022.
  • 1 pm EST: Join the FTC, CFPB, and Diverse Elders Coalition for a webinar about financial caregiving. You’ll learn about free resources to help caregivers and older adults plan for financial caregiving. We’ll also share information about how to spot, avoid, and report scams.
  • 2 pm EST: Join the FTC, SAGE, and AARP’s Fraud Watch Network for a webinar about how to recover from fraud. This interactive discussion will highlight possible ways to recover money lost to scammers, as well as how to cope with the emotional impact of scams and fraud.
  • 2pm EST: Join the FTC, Massachusetts Office of Consumer Affairs, Better Business Bureau, AARP, and Internal Revenue Service for a panel focused on top scams affecting people in Massachusetts.
  • 7pm ESTJoin a Facebook Live with the FTC and the Social Security Administration’s Office of the Inspector General. You’ll learn how to spot and avoid government impersonator scams. Please join and bring your questions!

Friday, March 11

For more information, and to get involved, check out ftc.gov/NCPW.

Updated March 3, 2022 to include additional events. 

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The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

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