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Today’s Summer Film Series feature is about something many recent graduates might be trying to put out of their minds this summer: student loans.*

As a recent graduate myself, I know firsthand the anxiety that comes with taking out student loans. Some scammers take advantage of this fear. Watch this video to see how scammers try to con you out of money.

Student Loan Debt Advertisment

The bottom line: many of these scammers will try to charge you for things that the Department of Education and its loan servicers will do for free.

Graphic of repaying student loans? Avoid Scams

Follow the tips in the video and infographic to avoid these costly scams. And consider reading up on student loans while relaxing by the pool this summer. Learning about a scam makes it that much easier to avoid. So share this video to help protect your friends and family, too.

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4 Comments


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The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

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xero
August 02, 2019
Thanks!
Margit Bittner
August 03, 2019
Any News about The money? How long must i wait for IT?
Wonder
August 03, 2019
Their website states that they drop student loans after a 25 year period. I have been paying on my student loan for 25 years now. It has always be in income-based repayment. They are telling me that it hasn't been. I have gotten complete payment histories from the previous company and with the company with whom it is with now and the state that it has.
Southerngrl49
August 03, 2019
First of all I’m disabled and will never work again thanks to my now Ex. So my loans are not 18,000 and I will never be able to repay that. It’s suppose to be 12,000 because the credit company doesn’t listen when I tell them to cut me off due to being disabled. No they keep adding charges. I’m not paying near that much. It’s totally wrong.