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The things we do throughout the course of our day give businesses access to information about our habits, tastes, and activities. Some might use it to deliver targeted ads to you, or to give you content based on your location, like stores nearby or the weather forecast. Others might sell or share that information.

Whether you use a computer, tablet, or mobile phone to go online, there are things you can do to protect your privacy. Check out ftc.gov/yourprivacy, your guide to protecting your privacy online. Here’s what it covers:

Online Tracking

Learn how online tracking works and what you can do about it. Plus:

  • How to change your privacy settings on your browser, your internet-connected TV, and your phone
  • How to opt out of target ads
  • What to know about ad blockers
  • How to opt out of data broker sites that sell your personal information
  • What to know about privacy and mobile apps

How To Secure Your Devices

Find out how to secure your internet-connected devices, starting with your router — it’s the key to privacy at home and in your small business. Plus:

  • How to know when your voice assistant is listening and ways to protect your privacy
  • Important security features for smartwatches
  • Using internet-connected (IP) cameras safely
  • Why it’s important to remove your personal data before you sell your car
  • What to do if you’re selling a home and leaving behind a smart thermostat, refrigerator, or other device

What To Know About Online Abuse and Harassment

Did you know some apps let people track you through your phone without your permission? Learn about stalking apps, how to tell if there is one on your phone, and what to do if there is.

If someone took or shared an intimate image of you without your consent, that’s considered non-consensual pornography. And that’s not OK. If that’s happened to you or someone you know, learn what steps you can take.

Your Guide to Protecting Your Privacy Online ftc.gov/yourprivacy

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1 Comments


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The purpose of this blog and its comments section is to inform readers about Federal Trade Commission activity, and share information to help them avoid, report, and recover from fraud, scams, and bad business practices. Your thoughts, ideas, and concerns are welcome, and we encourage comments. But keep in mind, this is a moderated blog. We review all comments before they are posted, and we won’t post comments that don’t comply with our commenting policy. We expect commenters to treat each other and the blog writers with respect.

  • We won’t post off-topic comments, repeated identical comments, or comments that include sales pitches or promotions.
  • We won’t post comments that include vulgar messages, personal attacks by name, or offensive terms that target specific people or groups.
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We don't edit comments to remove objectionable content, so please ensure that your comment contains none of the above. The comments posted on this blog become part of the public domain. To protect your privacy and the privacy of other people, please do not include personal information. Opinions in comments that appear in this blog belong to the individuals who expressed them. They do not belong to or represent views of the Federal Trade Commission.

afbp1951
June 02, 2021
great stuff :)