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Consumer Alert

What to do if your online love interest offers to teach you how to invest your money

Colleen Tressler
No one thinks their online love interest is going to scam them, but scammers are good at what they do. They establish an emotional connection with you so you’re more likely to believe that they’re an expert in cryptocurrency investing, for example. But that online love interest is a scammer. People have lost tens of thousands ― sometimes millions — of dollars to romance scammers.
Consumer Alert

Hurricane season 2024: How to avoid scams before and after a weather emergency

Colleen Tressler
Weather forecasters are predicting an active hurricane season, but if you live in large parts of the country — including those hit by tornadoes over Memorial Day Weekend — you’ve probably noticed more active storms of all types. To get started preparing for hurricane season or any storm, while avoiding scams, check ftc.gov/WeatherEmergencies for new information to help you spot, avoid, and report scams as you prepare for, deal with, and recover from extreme weather and natural disasters.
Consumer Alert

Adobe used hidden fee to trap people into paying for subscription plans, FTC says

Andrew Rayo
Maybe you want to try out a product for a little while before you make a long-term decision. So, you sign up for a monthly subscription plan. Everything is fine until you want to cancel and it turns out to be a yearly subscription with monthly payments. Surprise! That’s what the FTC says happened to people who signed up for monthly subscriptions with Adobe.
Consumer Alert

Spot scammers looking to profit from Midwest tornadoes

Gema de las Heras
Just as people in Nebraska, Iowa, Oklahoma, and other Midwestern states are reeling from the catastrophic damage caused by tornadoes and other severe weather, scammers are rolling in. They use all kinds of stories to try to trick not just those doing their best to recover, but also anyone who tries to help. The best way to steer clear of these disaster-chasing scammers? Know what their tactics have in common.
Consumer Alert

Let’s talk about spam texts and emails

Andrew Rayo
Another day, another round of spam texts and emails trying to sell you things. At best, spam is annoying. At worst, it’s pushing scams or trying to install malware on your device. If you’re tired of getting spam, there are some ways to help.
Consumer Alert

Skip the scams as you look for options to avoid foreclosure

Gema de las Heras
Are you having a hard time paying your mortgage? Even if you’ve missed payments or you’re already facing foreclosure, you still might have options. You really do, but that’s the same thing scammers will tell you. Fortunately, there are ways to spot mortgage relief scams while you focus on saving your home.
Consumer Alert

Mystery shopping, (fake) checks, and gift cards

Andrew Rayo
If you’re looking for a new job, getting paid to shop might sound like a dream. Companies hire mystery shoppers to try products or services and share experiences about things like buying or returning something, or their overall customer experience. But while some mystery shopping jobs are legitimate, many aren’t. So how do you spot the scams?
Consumer Alert

Scammers follow the news about student loan forgiveness

Terri Miller
Hearing a lot about federal student loan forgiveness in the news? You’re not alone — scammers are, too. You might get a call from someone saying they’re affiliated with Federal Student Aid (FSA) or the Department of Education. (They’re not.) They’ll say they’re following up on your eligibility for a new loan forgiveness program, and might even know things about your loan, like the balance or your account number. They’ll try to rush you into acting by saying the program is available for a limited time. But this is all a scam. What else do you need to know to spot scams like this?
Consumer Alert

Looking for a postal job? Also look out for job scams

Kira Krown
Thinking about applying for a job with the United States Postal Service (USPS)? Make sure you’re dealing with the real thing. Scammers advertise jobs that don’t actually exist to try to steal your money and personal information — and one way they do that is by pretending to be USPS. So how do you know if that postal ad or offer you get is a scam?