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Consumer Alert

College students are targeted with jobs scams, too

Terri Miller
Getting hired might feel like the ultimate high. But finding out it was just a scammer trying to steal your money will bring you — and your bank balance — right back down. Many college students look for virtual jobs they can do while going to school, but if a new employer mails your first paycheck before you even start working, that’s your cue to stop — it’s a scam.
Consumer Alert

Fighting back against harmful voice cloning

Alvaro Puig
If a call sounds like your boss (asking for bank account numbers) or your family member (begging for help in an emergency), you’re more likely to act. That’s why scammers use voice cloning to make their requests for money or information more believable. And the FTC is fighting back.
Consumer Alert

If someone you care about paid a scammer, here’s how to help

Jennifer Leach
Sharing a scam experience with someone you know takes courage. If someone trusts you enough to share their scam story, especially if the scammer is still in touch with them, here’s some advice to help guide you.
Consumer Alert

How to avoid getting wrapped up in a car wrap scam

Ari Lazarus
You’re looking to make some extra money and you get a text or email, or see an ad on social media: get paid to wrap your car and drive around. And the offers can sound good: $600-700 a week to drive around with an ad for some well-known company (usually an energy drink). Many times, these offers are scams — here’s how to spot them.
Consumer Alert

Influencers: Spot a job scam

Carol Kando-Pineda
Maybe you — or even your pet — are an influencer. But did you know that scammers might target you with phony job opportunities? You might get a message on social media, supposedly from a recruiter or “brand ambassador manager” of a national company. They say they’ll send you free products and pay you big bucks to promote and tag their stuff on social media. All you need to do, they say, is give them your banking information so they can pay you. But this isn’t a job opportunity. It’s a scam, and here’s how to avoid it.
Consumer Alert

If you have a timeshare, scammers might target you

Gema de las Heras
Maybe you weren’t thinking about selling your timeshare — but suddenly, someone calls and tells you they’re a real estate agent and have an interested buyer. They might have information about you and your property, so the offer seems credible. Then, the so-called timeshare expert asks you to pay upfront to finalize the deal. Stop. That could be a scam.
Consumer Alert

Is it a caregiving job or a scam?

Jim Kreidler
As a nanny or caregiver, you know that families and employers trust you to take care of their children or older adults. It’s the same trust that scammers want to build with you when they post ads for fake jobs to steal your money and personal information. So how do you spot the scam?
Consumer Alert

FTC Data Spotlight: New insights about imposter scams

Alvaro Puig
If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know that every year we report on the top scams people tell us about. And that we take a deeper dive into the data through our Data Spotlight reports. A new Data Spotlight about business and government imposters shines a light on the top imposter scams.
Consumer Alert

How to spot hard-to-spot rental scams

Ari Lazarus
Finding an apartment or house to rent that’s safe, affordable, and near amenities you want can be hard for anyone. Folks in the LGBTQ+ community often use community groups on social media to find housing rentals, and people often assume that what’s posted is vetted and safe for community members. But scammers post in these groups, too. Here are ways to spot and avoid rental scams.