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As part of the FTC’s ongoing efforts to protect you from shady sellers during the pandemic, the agency sent cease and desist demands to 25 companies that claimed their products can prevent or treat COVID-19. Treatments peddled by these companies include the use of vitamin C infusions, Ivermectin, peptide therapies, herbal remedies, teas, juices, filtered water, nasal irrigation, and seaweed extract. But there is no proof, as required by law, that any of these products can prevent or treat COVID-19 or the Delta or Omicron variants.

The companies identified today used social media to promote their unproven products. The sellers have 48 hours to notify the FTC of the specific actions they have taken to address the agency’s concerns. Companies failing to make adequate corrections could be sued under the 2020 COVID-19 Consumer Protection Act. Not only does the law make it illegal to deceptively market products that claim to prevent, treat, or cure COVID-19, it also lets the FTC seek financial penalties. In all, the agency has sent similar health-related cease and desist demands to more than 400 companies and individuals.

When it comes to fighting COVID-19 and spotting unsupported treatment claims, remember:

  • When there’s a medical breakthrough to treat, prevent, or cure a disease, you’re not going to hear about it for the first time through an ad or sales pitch.
  • Always talk with your doctor or healthcare professional before you try any product claiming to treat, prevent, or cure COVID-19.
  • Visit CDC.gov and the FDA.gov for the most up-to-date information about COVID-19 and its variants.

If you suspect fraud, tell the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

8 Comments


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lori
January 19, 2022
So, who are these 25 companies? Why aren't you naming them?
FTC Staff
January 19, 2022

In reply to by lori

This blog links to the press release, which lists the companies. Click on the words in blue letters at the start of the second paragraph: companies identified today to connect to the press release.

PTfromPNW
January 20, 2022

In reply to by lori

You always have to click on the post to see the entire article posted by the FTC to get the consumer Information of who they've filed against and why. The FTC employees work hard to protect us and catch the bad guys so lets be nice to them.
mm
January 19, 2022
Apparently I didn't see the list of 25 company names? It would be helpful to know that.
FTC Staff
January 19, 2022

In reply to by mm

This blog links to the press release, which lists the companies. Click on the words in blue letters at the start of the second paragraph: companies identified today to connect to the press release.

Sue
January 19, 2022
Why can’t we get the names of the companies?
cb
January 19, 2022
thanks for the information